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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Estimation of stress amongst the parents of neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit


1 Department of Pediatrics, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Psychiatry, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Uma Nath Singh Autonomous State Medical College, Jaunpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Department of Paediatrics, Uma Nath Singh Autonomous State Medical College, Jaunpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
6 Department of Paediatrics, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
7 Department of Business Administration, University of People, Pasadena, USA

Correspondence Address:
Richa Rathoria,
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Uma Nath Singh Autonomous State Medical College, Jaunpur, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/aihb.aihb_132_22

Introduction: The admission of the baby to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a stressful predicament for parents. This study aims to evaluate parental stress levels and the factors impacting them. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the NICU of a tertiary care centre for 3 months. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics of parents, neonates and Parental Stressor Scale: NICU (PSS: NICU) to measure parental stress. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and an independent t-test. Results: P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Most of the parents reported medium stress levels (3–3.9). The mean total parental stress score of parents was 3.31 (0.36). Amongst the PSS: NICU subscales, the NICU sight and sound caused maximum stress to the parents (mean = 3.35 [0.48]) followed by the relationship with the baby and parental role (mean = 3.34 [0.44]). Mothers felt more stressed as compared to fathers (mean = 3.60 [0.23] vs. 3.08 [0.28]; P < 0.05). Conclusion: Higher parental stress levels were seen in lower age group (18–25 years), less than high school education, unemployed and previous history of neonatal death, outborn deliveries, pre-term (gestational age <37 weeks), birth weight <1500 g, longer duration of respiratory support (>3 days), intubated with ventilatory support, not started on feeds and not given kangaroo mother care. Parents of NICU-admitted neonates are under significant stress, and there is a necessity to provide family-centred care.


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    -  Sisodia P
    -  Khan H
    -  Shukla NK
    -  Rathoria R
    -  Rathoria E
    -  Bansal U
    -  Shukla R
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