Advances in Human Biology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27--33

Relationship with maternal gut bacteria dysbiosis and gestational weight variation: A Case study of muhoza health center, Rwanda


Callixte Yadufashije1, Ishimwe Gatete Grace1, Lydia Mwanzia2, Liliane Muhimpundu1, Emmanuel Munyeshyaka1, Joseph Mucumbitsi1, Georges Bahati Sangano3, Thierry Habyarimana1 
1 Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, INES-Ruhengeri Institute of Applied Sciences, Musanze, Rwanda
2 Department of Midwifery and Gender, School of Nursing, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
3 Department of General Nursing, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda

Correspondence Address:
Callixte Yadufashije
Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, INES-Ruhengeri-Institute of Applied Sciences, Ruhengeri
Rwanda

Introduction: Dysbiosis is often used to describe the state where there is a disruption in the balance of organisms in the microbiota. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been associated with disorders within and without the gut. This study aimed to identify the microbiota composition and to determine the association between gut microbiota and gestation weight amongst women attending Muhoza health Center. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used where ninety stool samples were collected amongst pregnant women attending antenatal click of Muhoza health center. The samples were transported to Ines microbiology laboratory for microbiological analysis. Laboratory techniques including culturing, gram stain, and biochemical tests were performed for gut microbial identification. Analysis of variance was used to test the mean bacterial difference in pregnancy trimesters, a t-test was performed to test for the mean bacterial difference in the gestational weight gain (GWG) and gestational weight loss groups, and Chi-square test was used to test for association with gut bacteria imbalance and the gestational weight variation. Results: Lactobacillus 23.28% was the most predominant observed in the gut. The gut bacterial variation throughout pregnancy trimesters was observed (F = 4.437904575, P = 0.022909599). The gut bacterial mean difference was statistically significant in the weight gain and weight loss (t = 3.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.1487–0.5154, P = 0.005428) in the GWG and loss. There was statistical association with gut microbiota dysbiosis and gestational weight amongst pregnant women with Escherichia coli (P = 0.030197, 95% CI: 0.0741–0.4611, x2 = 7), Pseudomonas (P = 0.018316, 95% CI: 0.0941–0.4781, x2 = 8), and Citrobacter (P = 0.00046, 95% CI: 0.7855–0.9014, x2 = 15.38). The overall association (P = 0.001869, 95% CI: 0.9697–0.9868, x2 = 46.19) was statistically significant. Conclusion: Gut bacterial alteration contributes to gestational either weight gain or loss. During antenatal care, gut bacteria should be tested to maintain the gestational weight.


How to cite this article:
Yadufashije C, Grace IG, Mwanzia L, Muhimpundu L, Munyeshyaka E, Mucumbitsi J, Sangano GB, Habyarimana T. Relationship with maternal gut bacteria dysbiosis and gestational weight variation: A Case study of muhoza health center, Rwanda.Adv Hum Biol 2022;12:27-33


How to cite this URL:
Yadufashije C, Grace IG, Mwanzia L, Muhimpundu L, Munyeshyaka E, Mucumbitsi J, Sangano GB, Habyarimana T. Relationship with maternal gut bacteria dysbiosis and gestational weight variation: A Case study of muhoza health center, Rwanda. Adv Hum Biol [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Jan 23 ];12:27-33
Available from: https://www.aihbonline.com/article.asp?issn=2321-8568;year=2022;volume=12;issue=1;spage=27;epage=33;aulast=Yadufashije;type=0